A third of the U.S. population will experience heat advisories on Tuesday and Wednesday as a week of record-breaking temperatures continues, according to the National Weather Service.

A “heat dome” is expected to bring triple-digit temperatures to portions of the Midwest, adding to the early onset temperatures already baking the Southwest.

From California to Virginia, approximately 100 million Americans are under heat advisories, heat warnings or heat watches.

St. Louis reported a record-high temperature of 100 degrees on Monday, and the heat index in parts of the Midwest neared 115 degrees.

From Raleigh, North Carolina, to Chicago, actual temperatures are expected to reach near 100 degrees on Tuesday.

Heat wave creating a ‘dangerous situation’ across the southern US as millions will feel triple digit temperatures this week

More than 65 million people from California to Tennessee are under some type of heat alert Sunday, as dangerously high temperatures persist across the Southwest and the southern and central Plains.

Among the heat alerts in places Sunday are heat advisories, excessive heat watches and excessive heat warnings. Cities under heat advisories include El Paso, Dallas and Houston in Texas, along with Oklahoma City, Kansas City, New Orleans and Nashville. Cities under excessive heat warnings include San Antonio and Austin in Texas; Tulsa, Oklahoma; and Phoenix and Tucson in Arizona.

Sunday will be the last day of record heat across the Southwest before a strong cold front is expected to move through the region, cooling temperatures to more seasonal values, as summer officially remains nine days away.

No end in sight: Dangerous heat continues across portions of central, western US.

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Washington’s high reading of 99 degrees outstripped and out sweltered by 2 degrees the old record for June 17, set only eight years ago. It was the hottest day of 2022, and seemed possessed of enough thermal power, enough searing solar blaze, to be recognized as true summer, whether before the solstice or after

Hottest day, and set a June 17 record

Some purists might insist that we can’t experience summer until Tuesday’s solstice. Most of us, however, might be hard pressed to classify Friday, with its record high temperature, as anything but simmering summer.

Washington’s high reading of 99 degrees outstripped and outsweltered by 2 degrees the old record for June 17, set only eight years ago.

It was the hottest day of 2022, and seemed possessed of enough thermal power, enough searing solar blaze, to be recognized as true summer, whether before the solstice or after.